Grilled Cheese

Question of the day– Why is grilled cheese so delicious, yet so simple?  So I’m actually boiling some chicken pot pie ravioli from Trader Joe’s (TJs, I owe you one!), but I think I might just make myself a grilled cheese sandwich for a snack today, just because.

Is it a sign that I’m a grownup that I get excited when the Tuesday grocery ads come so I can plan what groceries I’m going to buy?  Also, grapes are in season and 88cents a pound at Sprouts!  Now normally I’m not a huge fan of grapes, but since it’s the season, I think I might venture out and try them again.

 

How to Peel an Orange

Wait, what?  Yes, there is actually a VIDEO about this.

…  Now I’m generally not one to be wow’d by how-to food videos, but this one, I was like, wait, really?  Is it a cultural thing?  Do most people really not know how to peel oranges?  Hm.

Mom peeled oranges for me and my brother all the time growing up.  The prize for finishing dinner was fruit for dessert.  Mom always peeled the fruit for us and placed it in our bowls, like the spoiled children we were.  It was a simple process, one I could copy easily.  She would make a few long cuts lengthwise around the orange and two crosswise cuts near the top and the bottom, just deep enough to get to the skin but not too deep that juice would start spilling out.  She’d peel the thick skin off the top and bottom, and then peel the slivers of skin from the sides. You’d end up with a nice round ball covered with remaining white, soft ridges of what my parents liked to called “fiber” or pith.  Sometimes they peeled it off, and sometimes, they left some of it on for our health.  Ugh, my favorite.  Then, the orange would get split in two and we would be able to peel off the slices of orange without any mess.

I wonder if it’s an Asian thing to prepare oranges like this?  In fact, I didn’t know how to cut an orange into pretty slices because we never did it that way.  I always felt that cut slices of oranges tasted slightly better though, and my theory is that’s probably because with the slice, the pith isn’t the first part that hits your tongue.

Speaking of Asian, the husband and I went to visit Colorado this weekend.  We noticed the food there is decidedly Boulder (bolder, ha ha .. !), and saltier.  So the rumors are true.  I wouldn’t mind living in the middle of America though.  The skies were actually a lovely blue, and you could still see the stars at night.  No smog or city lights to drown out their shine.

Eat By Date

I have this weird thing where when I have leftover groceries from a recipe, I don’t use them up immediately because I don’t want to eat the same thing two days in a row.  What happens is that the grocery, in this case, asparagus, sits in the fridge.  It sits in the fridge for maybe a week before I realize, “OMG, I forgot about that.”  I immediately wonder, “Is it still good?”  and because I’m too scared to check, I LEAVE IT IN THERE to check later.  It’s the most illogical thing ever, but the fear prevails.  -_____-  I know, I know.

So days pass, and the asparagus is nagging me from the bottom of our fridge, but I can’t bring myself to look.  I’m afraid of what I might find.  Finally, when it’s time to clean out the fridge because we’re going on a trip, I take it out, and Google “How do you know if asparagus is bad?”  The asparagus doesn’t smell so good, but the texture isn’t as bad as I thought it would be.  The appearance has definitely changed.  It’s definitely not firm anymore, and I even found one stalk that had what looked like mold!  (OK, it was definitely mold)  But some of the stalks seem like they’re firm enough to still eat?  Maybe?  Do I risk it?  So I go through the asparagus, and think to myself, well maybe if I cook it, it’ll be okay, because I hate throwing out food.  I rinse them, even snap them up into bite sized pieces.  But a twinge of doubt is there.

So then I do some more Googling and ask, “When is it okay to just cut off moldy parts and eat the rest?”  Apparently, according to USDA, hard veggies and hard cheese where mold is part of the process are O-K.  Everything else, nope.  The asparagus?  I think it’s hard but porous enough to be considered a soft veggie, which is what USDA considers cucumber.  Bah.  I guess I’m throwing my asparagus away.

So I guess this is my umpteenth lesson that I should just use up everything, but then I end up with oddly ratio’d meals.  What is a girl to do?  Have asparagus two days in a row?  Does it freeze well?  That’s a Google search for another time.

Meanwhile, I have some sirloin (I think?) defrosting.  What to do with it?